Ancient Greece


declassified

Enter a world of forgotten knowledge.

Episodes


Food for the Soul Republic III w/ Angie Hobbs

In the second half of book 3 of the Republic, Plato lays out the controversial theory of mimesis, which states that all art, man-made objects, and cultural products in our environment have profound effects on the health of our souls.

Food for the Soul Republic III w/ Angie Hobbs

The Justice Loophole w/ Rachel Barney

Our exploration of Plato's Republic continues with this discussion of book 2 with philosopher Rachel Barney. Is the fear of God necessary for morality? How can you educate people so that they value and practice justice?

The Justice Loophole w/ Rachel Barney

All Men Would Be Tyrants (Plato’s Republic II)

If you gave people the power to do anything they wanted and never face any consequences for their actions, would they inevitably turn into monsters? Or are there reasons why we should be motivated to behave morally and justly even when all external constraints on our behavior are lifted?

All Men Would Be Tyrants (Plato’s Republic II)

The Hunt for Justice (Plato’s Republic I)

Our series on Plato’s Republic continues with this deep dive into book 1. What makes it good philosophy? What makes it fine literature? And what does book 1 accomplish in the context of the entire Republic?

The Hunt for Justice (Plato’s Republic I)

Rome's Most Lethal Weapon w/ Steele Brand

Rome conquered the world without a professional army, relying instead on its citizens to take up arms when necessary. How did Rome's part-time soldiers defeat all the great powers of ancient Mediterranean?

Rome's Most Lethal Weapon w/ Steele Brand

Penelope: Weaver of Fate w/ Olga Levaniouk

Penelope is one of the most compelling yet enigmatic characters from Greek mythology. Homerist Olga Levaniouk joins us to illuminate the complexities of her character and role in the Odyssey.

Penelope: Weaver of Fate w/ Olga Levaniouk

Thucydides: A Historian for Our Time? w/ Emily Greenwood

The Athenian historian Thucydides observed and chronicled the greatest military conflict of his day: the epic contest between Athens and Sparta known as the Peloponnesian War (431-404BC). More than just a straightforward history, his work is a study of the struggle between democracy and oligarchy, as well as a meditation on the dangers of populism and political polarization. Perhaps for this reason, Thucydides' work has experienced a surge in popularity over recent years as polarization and civil strife have spread throughout the developed world. In this episode we are joined by Emily Greenwood, professor of classics at Yale University and author of Thucydides and the Shaping of History. Our conversation covers Thucydides' historical context, his ambition and purpose in writing his history, his insights and blindspots, and his relevance to our world. Stick around at the end of the episode for a chance to win an autographed edition of Greenwood's book Thucydides and the Shaping of History. *** The intro to this episode was provided by Dr. Greenfield and Dr. Radford of The Partial Historians podcast. Dr. G and Dr. Rad both hold PhD's in Roman history and they offer a unique take on the Roman world that combines humor, storytelling, and scholarly rigor. Check out their show at partialhistorians.com. *** Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/greecepodcast Or make a one-time donation: paypal.me/greecepodcast *** Scholarly works mentioned during the conversation: The Blinded Eye: Thucydides and the New Written Word by Greg Crane (particularly Chapter 4: “Thucydidean Exclusions and the

Thucydides: A Historian for Our Time? w/ Emily Greenwood

Oligarchy, Part 2: Nemesis w/ Matt Simonto

What institutions do oligarchic regimes use to maintain power? How do they fend off the threat of democratic revolution? What happened to the many oligarchies of the ancient Mediterranean?

Oligarchy, Part 2: Nemesis w/ Matt Simonto

The Origins of Philosophy w/ André Laks

Philosophy first emerged in ancient Greece 2600 years ago. What drove a group of thinkers at that time to suddenly cast off old beliefs and embark on radically new avenues of inquiry and investigation?

The Origins of Philosophy w/ André Laks

A History of Inequality w/ Walter Scheidel

We live at a time of increasing economic inequality worldwide. What is driving this trend? And what could stop it? And what does the historical data we have tell us about inequality?

A History of Inequality w/ Walter Scheidel

Rome's Lost Epics w/ Rhiannon Evans

The oldest Roman epics we have were produced during the Roman Empire. But before becoming an empire, Rome was a powerful republic for hundreds of years. What happened to the Roman epics from the republican period?

Rome's Lost Epics w/ Rhiannon Evans

How to Succeed in the Iron Age w/ Alicia Stallings

Hesiod's unusual epic called Works and Days is probably most famous for containing the stories of Prometheus and Pandora. But these tales are part of a greater mission of explaining how one can live justly and succeed in a harsh world.

How to Succeed in the Iron Age w/ Alicia Stallings

How Democracies Fall Apart w/ Melissa Lane

Hundreds of city-states in the ancient world experimented with democracy. Most of them experienced some kind of civil strife at some point. What caused these breakdowns of social order, and are we headed towards a similar fate?

How Democracies Fall Apart w/ Melissa Lane

Platonic Love w/ Zina Giannopoulou

'Platonic love' is one of the most fascinating (and misunderstood) concepts to have come down to us from the ancient Greeks. Classicist Zina Giannopoulou joins us to set the record straight about the origins of the concept and what Plato's radical theory of love was all about.

Platonic Love w/ Zina Giannopoulou

Dialogue and Dialectic w/ MM McCabe

Philosopher MM McCabe joins us to discuss the art of the philosophical dialogue, both as a literary form and as a practice between people in real-time conversation. What makes Plato's dialogues, for example, worth reading?

Dialogue and Dialectic w/ MM McCabe

Decoding Atlantis w/ Mark Adams

No other story from ancient Greece has fueled so many controversies and as the story of Atlantis. All of the written “evidence” from ancient times is contained in the work of a single author–the philosopher Plato. Bestselling author Mark Adams joins us to discuss the theories about Plato's tale.

Decoding Atlantis w/ Mark Adams

The Comedy of Democracy w/ Edith Hall

World-renowned classicist Edith Hall joins us to discuss the relation between entertainment and politics in ancient Athens, particularly on the comic stage.

The Comedy of Democracy w/ Edith Hall

Caves and Classrooms w/ Raffaella Cribiore

Raffaella Cribiore, professor of Classics at New York University and award-winning author of “Gymnastics of the Mind: Greek Education in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt,” joins us to talk about what the archaeological evidence from Egypt can tell us about schools...

Caves and Classrooms w/ Raffaella Cribiore

Hannibal Takes On Rome w/ Patrick Hunt

Hannibal was a general from the republic of Carthage in north Africa and one of the greatest military strategists of all time. Joining us to discuss the man behind the legend is archaeologist Patrick Hunt of Stanford University.

Hannibal Takes On Rome w/ Patrick Hunt

The World's Oldest Computer w/ Xenophon Moussas

Xenophon Moussas is professor of physics at the National and Kapodistrian University in Athens as well as a MMer of the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project and he joins us to shed light on this marvel from the ancient world.

The World's Oldest Computer w/ Xenophon Moussas

The Persian Wars w/ Ian Morris

Ian Morris, archaeologist and professor of Classics at Stanford University, joins us for a discussion on the Persian invasions of Greece in 490-479 BC. How did the Greeks pull off a totally unexpected victory against the biggest invasion force that had ever been launched?

The Persian Wars w/ Ian Morris

What Is Greek Tragedy? w/ Rush Rehm

Rush Rehm, professor of Classics and of Theater and Performing Studies at Stanford University, joins us for a discussion about one of the most pivotal and enigmatic developments in the ancient world: the invention of theater in Athens in the late 6th century BC.

What Is Greek Tragedy? w/ Rush Rehm

Bronze Age Apocalypse 1177 BC w/ Eric H. Cline

Most of the civilizations of the late bronze age were mysteriously destroyed at around the same time in the 12th century BC. Archaeologists have been debating what caused this destruction for over a century...

Bronze Age Apocalypse 1177 BC w/ Eric H. Cline

About us


Ancient Greece Declassified is a podcast about making the “Classics” accessible to everyone. Thanks to archaeology and modern scholarship, we now know more about the ancient world than we ever did before. However, the average person today doesn't have access to free, reliable, up-to-date information about ancient Greece. Unlike other fields, the Classics have remained largely confined to the ivory tower of academia. It's time to change that. The Classics shouldn't be just for people lucky enough to go to certain schools. Everyone should be able to know about the ideas and events that inspired the founders of this republic. Let's declassify the classics.

The host of the podcast, Lantern Jack, holds a PhD in ancient philosophy from Princeton University. When not reading old books, he loves to travel and to play music. Exploring ancient Greece combines both of these passions, since the past is a foreign country, and ancient Greece in particular is a musical place.

The music for this podcast is provided by the incomparable Jason Webley.

Special thanks to patrons:
Emilee Morrish
Hein Roehrig
Stephen Trevick
Nadia Braun
Dmitri Graf

Contact


TO: Lantern Jack

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